Integrated Approach for Mitigation of Arsenic Contamination of Drinking Water in Bangladesh
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Integrated Approach for Mitigation of Arsenic Contamination of Drinking Water in Bangladesh an arsenic mitigation project in Sharsha Upazila, Jessore : final report, November 2004. by Integrated Approach for Mitigation of Arsenic Contamination of Drinking Water in Bangladesh (Project)

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Published by Japan International Cooperation Agency, Asia Arsenic Network in [Dhaka] .
Written in English


Book details:

Edition Notes

Includes statistical tables.

ContributionsAsia Arsenic Network., Kokusai Kyōryoku Jigyōdan. Bangladesh.
The Physical Object
Paginationxxiv, 110 p. :
Number of Pages110
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL3441059M
ISBN 109843217888
LC Control Number2005310541
OCLC/WorldCa61451807

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Shallow groundwater in Bangladesh is widely experiencing arsenic contamination of geogenic origin, with concentrations both above the WHO guideline value for drinking-water (10 µg/l) and the Bangladesh national standard (50 µg/l). Since its discovery in the early ’s, a major effort has been.   Chronic arsenic poisoning in Bangladesh through contaminated drinking water results in a major public health burden, especially for the rural poor segment of the population. Arsenic was first detected in the groundwater in the s in West Bengal, India. Several studies by different scientists have been performed and solutions have been proposed. Integrated Approach for Mitigation of Arsenic Contamination of Drinking Water in Bangladesh An arsenic Mitigation project in Sharsha Upazila, Jessore Is/was the above mentioned project a.   Arsenic problems have been observed in several countries around the world. The challenges of arsenic mitigation are more difficult for developing and poor countries due to resource and other limitations. Bangladesh is experiencing the worst arsenic problem in the world, as about 30 million people are possibly drinking arsenic contaminated water.

Sakamoto, M., Fukushima, Y., & Hagihara, Y. (). Socio systems approach to disaster mitigation of arsenic contaminated drinking water in Bangladesh. Journal of Japan Society of Hydrology and Water Resources, 20(5), – CrossRef Google Scholar.   Arsenic is not just a Bangladesh problem — it can be found in drinking water supplies around the world. Maine, Massachusetts, Texas, and half a dozen other states have all had arsenic contamination problems, says Joseph Graziano, a professor of environmental health sciences and pharmacology at Columbia University. But access to safe drinking water is still low at per cent. Between and , the proportion of the population drinking arsenic-affected water dropped from per cent to per cent. Yet Bangladesh is still the country with the largest proportion of people exposed to arsenic contamination .   Drink arsenic-free waterDrink arsenic-free water Workable solutionsWorkable solutions Implementation Plan for ArsenicImplementation Plan for Arsenic Mitigation of Bangladesh Mitigation of Bangladesh (GOB)(GOB) Improved dug wellsImproved dug wells Pond sand filtersPond sand filters

Downloadable! A major environmental tragedy of modern times is the widespread arsenic contamination of shallow drinking water wells in rural Bangladesh which went unrecognized for years. Large numbers of people are now starting to show a range of symptoms long associated with chronic arsenic exposure. Rural families in Bangladesh, one of the poorest countries in the world, face . ・ Integrated Approach for Mitigation of the Arsenic Contamination of Drinking Water in Bangladesh (JICA Partnership Project with AAN, ) ・ Dispatch of individual experts in arsenic mitigation to Local Government Division (, , ) and Department of Public Health Engineering () Other donors’ cooperation. Arsenic, Drinking-water and health risk substitution in arsenic mitigation: a discussion paper Introduction A key policy lesson for public health protection that emerges from the arsenic crisis in Bangladesh is that in improving water supply services, consideration must be given of the degree of public health risk substitution that may result. Arsenic can enter the water supply from natural deposits in the earth or from industrial and agricultural pollution. It is widely believed that naturally occurring arsenic dissolves out of certain rock formations when ground water levels drop significantly.